Tuesday, September 27

SpaceX

NASA spacecraft on track for asteroid deflection experiment – Spaceflight Now
SpaceX

NASA spacecraft on track for asteroid deflection experiment – Spaceflight Now

Artist’s concept of the DART spacecraft, with its LICIACube ride along spacecraft, approaching asteroids Didymos and Dimorphos. Credit: NASA A NASA spacecraft is aiming to slam into a stadium-size asteroid at more than 14,000 mph Monday in a planetary defense experiment to test a technique that could be used in the future to divert threatening asteroids off a collision course with Earth. The Double Asteroid Redirection Test, or DART, mission will try to change the orbit of the asteroid Dimorphos, the smaller object in a binary pair of asteroids circling the sun close to Earth’s orbit. Dimorphos and its larger companion, named Didymos, pose no near-term threat to Earth, according to NASA. Scientists will measure how the DART spacecraft’s collision changes the course of Dimorphos around Did...
Delta 4-Heavy rocket deploys spysat on final planned mission from ‘Slick Six’ – Spaceflight Now
SpaceX

Delta 4-Heavy rocket deploys spysat on final planned mission from ‘Slick Six’ – Spaceflight Now

EDITOR’S NOTE: Updated Sept. 25 with satellite sightings and radio signal detections. ULA’s Delta 4-Heavy rocket climbs away from Space Launch Complex 6 at Vandenberg Space Force Base to begin the NROL-91 mission Saturday. Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now United Launch Alliance sent a triple-core Delta 4-Heavy with a top secret U.S. government spy satellite into orbit Saturday from California’s Central Coast, closing out a chapter in the tangled history of a launch pad originally built to support military astronaut missions on Titan rockets and space shuttles. The spy satellite on-board the Delta 4-Heavy is owned by the National Reconnaissance Office, which discloses few details about its spacecraft. The circumstances of the launch Saturday — its launch site, rocket configuration,...
Historic launch pad faces uncertain future after final West Coast Delta 4 mission – Spaceflight Now
SpaceX

Historic launch pad faces uncertain future after final West Coast Delta 4 mission – Spaceflight Now

A Delta 4-Heavy rocket stands on its launch pad Friday at Vandenberg Space Force Base, California, ready for liftoff on the NROL-91 mission for the National Reconnaissance Office. Credit: United Launch Alliance United Launch Alliance will move out of historic Space Launch Complex 6 at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California following the flight of a Delta 4-Heavy rocket set for Saturday, leaving the military to find a new tenant for the launch pad once intended to host space shuttle missions on the West Coast. The Delta 4-Heavy rocket is scheduled to blast off at 2:53 p.m. PDT (5:53 p.m. EDT; 2153 GMT) Saturday from the SLC-6 launch site, nestled on a remote hillside overlooking the Pacific Ocean near the southwestern edge of Vandenberg Space Force Base, roughly 140 miles (225 kilometer...
SpaceX

SpaceX counting down to another Starlink launch from Florida – Spaceflight Now

Live coverage of the countdown and launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. The Starlink 4-35 mission will launch SpaceX’s next batch of 52 Starlink broadband satellites. Follow us on Twitter. SpaceX Webcast Another group of 52 Starlink internet satellites will rocket into orbit Saturday night from Cape Canaveral on top of a Falcon 9 launcher, continuing deployment of SpaceX’s global broadband network now accessible from all seven continents. The 229-foot-tall (70-meter) Falcon 9 rocket is set to lift of from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station at 7:32:10 p.m. EDT (2332:10 GMT) Saturday. SpaceX has a backup launch time available at 8:51 p.m. EDT (0051 GMT). The 52 Starlink satellites on-board the Falcon 9 will ...
NASA astronaut launches to space station aboard Russian rocket – Spaceflight Now
SpaceX

NASA astronaut launches to space station aboard Russian rocket – Spaceflight Now

STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS & USED WITH PERMISSION A Soyuz rocket lifts off Sept. 21 with a crew of three heading for the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls Despite severely strained U.S.-Russian foreign relations, an American astronaut joined two Russian cosmonauts aboard a Soyuz spacecraft in Kazakhstan and rocketed into orbit Wednesday on a two-orbit flight to the International Space Station. With commander Sergey Prokopyev at the controls, flanked on the left by co-pilot Dmitry Petelin and on the right by NASA astronaut Frank Rubio, the Soyuz 2.1a rocket roared to life at 9:54 a.m. EDT (6:54 p.m. local time) and smoothly climbed away from its firing stand at the Baikonur Cosmodrome. All three crew members appeared relaxed in cockpit video as they monitored their...