Sunday, November 27

Astronomy

Hubble captures rare ‘light echo’ from star explosion
Astronomy

Hubble captures rare ‘light echo’ from star explosion

Host-subtracted F555W-band HST image of SN 2016adj on +1991 days, with the positions of LE1, LE2, LE3, and LE4 highlighted by colored rings and labeled. Credit: The Astrophysical Journal Letters (2022). https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/ac93f8 When a star explodes (a supernova), it sends its intense burst of light out in all directions. On rare occasions, in the months and years that follow, rings of light or "light echoes" spread out from the original supernova position. This is what is descr...
A Nearby Star Has Completely Blasted Away the Atmosphere From its Planet
Astronomy

A Nearby Star Has Completely Blasted Away the Atmosphere From its Planet

What if you placed an Earth-sized planet in a close orbit around an M-dwarf star? It’s more than an academic question since M dwarfs are the most numerous stars we know. A group of astronomers studying the planet GJ 1252b found an answer and it’s not pretty. Since this planet is so close to its star, it receives a lot of heat. And that proximity is deadly in another way. “The pressure from the star’s radiation is immense, enough to blow a planet’s atmosphere away,” said Michelle Hill, a University of California Riverside astrophysicist and co-author of a recent paper focused on GJ 1252b. The planet lies some 65 light-years from Earth and orbits its star twice every 24 Earth hours. The heat from the star renders this world inhospitable. Illustration of the atmosphere being blown away fro...
ARMAGH OBSERVATORY AND PLANETARIUM EMPLOYEE TAKES ADDITIONAL ROLE WITH PLANETARIA ASSOCIATION – Astronotes
Astronomy

ARMAGH OBSERVATORY AND PLANETARIUM EMPLOYEE TAKES ADDITIONAL ROLE WITH PLANETARIA ASSOCIATION – Astronotes

Education and Outreach Manager, Sinead Mackle, Takes Up UK Wide Post Sinead Mackle, Education and Outreach Manager at world renowned astronomical research centre, Armagh Observatory and Planetarium, is set to take up the voluntary post of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) Officer with the UK and ROI based Council of the British Association of Planetaria (BAP).   In the role, which will be held for at least two years, Sinead will function as an impartial point of contact on the Council to address concerns or queries regarding matters of equity, diversity, or inclusion. She will also address any grievances relating to the International Planetarium Society Code of Conduct.   Sinead will also work with the Council to select future conference venues and facilitate the participation of all ...
A Local Group heavyweight – Astronomy Now
Astronomy

A Local Group heavyweight – Astronomy Now

Messier 33, the Triangulum Galaxy, is a magnificent-looking spiral galaxy. It’s the third-largest in the Local Group of galaxies. The giant H-II region NGC 604 is easy to see to the upper left of M33’s core. Image: Terry Hancock. Messier 33 (NGC 598), the famous Triangulum Galaxy, takes its nickname from the constellation that hosts it. is a superb spiral galaxy that favourably presents itself face-on to our line of sight. Physically, it’s the third-largest galaxy in our Local Group of galaxies, and as major galaxies go, only marvellous M31 in Andromeda lies closer to us. These attributes give us a breathtaking view of it across its beautiful and complex form, which is substantial enough to make it appear over twice the size of the full Moon. Eagle-eyed observers at the darkest sites can ...
Astronomy

Will we ever see pictures of the big bang? We ask an expert | Social trends

The pictures from the James Webb telescope – described by Nasa as a “time machine” because the light has taken billions of years to reach us – raise the question: will it be possible to someday see the big bang itself? I asked Dr Matthew Bothwell, public astronomer at the University of Cambridge.Why is the James Webb telescope so good?First, it’s infrared. Firefighters wear infrared goggles because it helps them see through smoke and dust, and stars form behind a lot of smoke and dust. Also, and this is a bit technical, light that arrives from distant space is redshifted. That’s because, as the universe is growing and the light is travelling across it, the light gets stretched and becomes redder. Finally, the telescope is just really big.If the universe is stretching, why isn’t Earth? Why ...