Tuesday, April 16

NASA

March Equinox Welcomes ‘Astronomical’ Spring – NASA Blogs
NASA

March Equinox Welcomes ‘Astronomical’ Spring – NASA Blogs

by Lance D. Davis Did you know our planet has two types of seasons? They are meteorological and astronomical. What’s the difference? “Meteorological seasons” follow the changing of the calendar, month to month, and are based on the annual temperature cycle – seasonal temperature variations modified by fluctuations in the amount of solar radiation received by Earth’s surface over the course of a year. For instance, the meteorological season of spring begins each year on March 1 and will end on May 31. However, “astronomical” seasons happen because of the tilt of Earth’s axis (with respect to the Sun-Earth plane), and our planet’s position during its orbit around the Sun. An illustration of the March (spring) and September (fall or autumn) equinoxes. During the equinoxes, both hemispheres...
NASA — 4 Little Known Women Who Made Huge Contributions…
NASA

NASA — 4 Little Known Women Who Made Huge Contributions…

October 3 is National Techies Day…and here at NASA we have quite a few people who get REALLY excited about technology. Without techies and the technology they develop, we wouldn’t be able to do the amazing things we do at NASA, or on Earth and in space. Our TechiesWe love our techies! The passionate engineers, researchers and scientists who work on our technology efforts enable us to make a difference in the world around us. They are responsible for developing the pioneering, new technologies and capabilities needed to achieve our current and future missions.Research and technology development take place within our centers, in academia and industry, and leverage partnerships with other government agencies and international partners. We work to engage and inspire thousands of technologists ...
Antenna work delays NISAR launch
NASA

Antenna work delays NISAR launch

WASHINGTON — Modifications to a large deployable antenna on a joint U.S.-Indian radar spacecraft will delay its launch, likely to the second half of the year. In a March 22 statement, NASA said a new launch date for the NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) mission will be set at the end of April because of work to protect the spacecraft’s reflector, an antenna that is 12 meters across when fully deployed, from temperatures when in its stowed configuration. “Testing and analysis identified a potential for the reflector to experience higher-than-previously-anticipated temperatures in its stowed configuration in flight,” NASA said in the statement. To prevent those increased temperatures, a “special coating” will be applied to the antenna so that it reflects more sunlight....
Dive into the Texas musical artists turning up the volume at Moon 2 Mars
NASA

Dive into the Texas musical artists turning up the volume at Moon 2 Mars

Are you ready to add some “space” to your spring break in the Space City? We got you, explorer. Space Center Houston’s Moon 2 Mars Festival, presented by Wellby Financial, is back for year three. Beginning Wednesday, March 13 through Saturday, March 16, the festival celebrates the wonders of space with live music, cutting-edge space tech, immersive experiences, Texas barbecue and more. The festival ends on Saturday, March 16 with internationally renowned rock band The All-American Rejects hitting the stage at 7:30 p.m. But every day is loaded with musical artists and DJs representing the Lone Start State! Learn more about these artists and their set times at the festival! We’ve compiled this quick mission brief for you and your crew—so sit back, relax and enjoy this lineup of Te...
NASA

IXPE Checks Out X-rays from Extreme Objects – NASA Blogs

NASA’s Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) mission, a joint effort with the Italian Space Agency, has returned data that no other spacecraft has obtained before from a few extreme cosmic objects. NASA’s Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) Launched in December 2021, IXPE has detected polarized X-rays from three of its first six targets. Polarized X-rays carry unique details about where the light comes from and what it passes through. By combining these details with measurements of X-rays’ energy and how they change over time, we get a fuller picture of an object and how it works. Prior to IXPE, the only cosmic object with polarized X-ray measurements was the Crab Nebula, the wreckage of a massive, exploded star whose light swept past Earth nearly 1,000 years ago. In these new...