Thursday, August 11

Astronomy

North America Nebula is a true likeness – Astronomy Now
Astronomy

North America Nebula is a true likeness – Astronomy Now

A widefield view of the North America Nebula and the Pelican Nebula. Image: Panagiotis Andreou. The North America Nebula (NGC 7000/Caldwell 20) in Cygnus is a fantastic emission nebula, an iconic object providing one of the highlights of the summer sky. These days amateurs like to give a name to deep-sky objects and many monikers leave one head-scratching, trying to match a figure or pattern to the name. The North America Nebula is different: it really does bear an uncanny resemblance to the North American continent! It’s also a great imaging target and can be seen through a pair of binoculars under a dark sky. The North America Nebula is located in Cygnus, a few degrees east of Deneb (alpha [a] Cygni). AN graphic by Greg Smye-Rumsby. How to observe The familiar form of Cygnus, the Swan, ...
Astronomy

Perseid meteor shower 2022: how and where to watch in Australia | Australia news

After the night sky in Australia was illuminated by a trio of meteor showers – the Piscis Austrinids, the Southern Delta Aquariids and the Alpha Capricornids late last month, stargazers will be able to see the 2022 Perseid meteor shower peak on 13 August.The Perseids are considered by Nasa to be “the best meteor shower of the year”. This year, however, they coincide with a full moon on 12 August, resulting in less than ideal viewing conditions. Due to the brightness of the Perseids, though, some meteors should still be visible in a sky illuminated by moonlight.What are meteor showers?Meteor showers occur when cosmic debris enters the Earth’s atmosphere. The source of this debris is often from comets, which have long orbits around the sun.“Like my cat, comets shed bits,” says Professor Orso...
ARMAGH OBSERVATORY AND PLANETARIUM PARTNERS WITH LIBRARIES NI TO GIFT ALL NI LIBRARIES FREE SCIENCE BOOKS – Astronotes
Astronomy

ARMAGH OBSERVATORY AND PLANETARIUM PARTNERS WITH LIBRARIES NI TO GIFT ALL NI LIBRARIES FREE SCIENCE BOOKS – Astronotes

Armagh Observatory & Planetarium (AOP) has partnered with Libraries NI to distribute across the province 200 free copies of its brand-new children’s science book, “Big Book of Experiments and Bright Ideas.” Designed and written by AOP staff, the book was inspired by the success of the Planetarium’s ‘Science@Home’ online programme, which AOP introduced during the lockdown to ensure that the NI public retained access to information about the world of science. The success of the programme, which saw budding young scientists and their families engage in at home science experiments, inspired the team at AOP to compile this easily accessible information into an engaging book that has proven a useful resource for those wishing to access science in a fun and practical way. AOP Team at Armagh L...
Observe the dramatic Dumbbell Nebula – Astronomy Now
Astronomy

Observe the dramatic Dumbbell Nebula – Astronomy Now

The Dumbbell Nebula (Messier 27) is one of the finest deep-sky objects in the entire sky. Image: Steve Milne. The glorious Dumbbell Nebula, in Vulpecula, is unquestionably one of the top planetary nebulae in the entire sky. It was the first planetary nebula discovered, in 1764 by Charles Messier, and John Hershel coined its nickname after his father William had recognised its two-lobe shape. Also well known as Messier 27, it’s bright enough to be detected through a modest pair of binoculars, and even a small telescope will begin to reveal the hour-glass or dumbbell structure that gives it such a distinctive appearance. Add to this is the fact that many observers rate the Dumbbell as one of the easiest of all planetary nebulae to observe, as it shows up well in a light-polluted or moonlit ...
Radio “Heartbeat” Teases Fast Radio Burst Origins – Sky & Telescope
Astronomy

Radio “Heartbeat” Teases Fast Radio Burst Origins – Sky & Telescope

Using the CHIME radio telescope, astronomers detected a three-second flash from a far-off galaxy that contained beat with a surprising regularity. Photo courtesy of CHIME, with background edited by MIT News Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are extremely powerful flashes of radio waves that typically last only a few milliseconds. They are usually detected as singular events, but a few have been found to repeat. The vast majority of those observed so far have come from far beyond our galaxy, and their origins remain mysterious. But now, an international collaboration has detected a unique FRB that might finally give us some answers. Fast Radio Burst Origins The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) radio telescope in British Columbia is well-su...