Monday, August 2

Astronomy

The 1995 Hubble photo that changed astronomy
Astronomy

The 1995 Hubble photo that changed astronomy

The 1995 Hubble photo that changed astronomy The Hubble Deep Field, explained by the man who made it happen. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO If you hold a pin at arm’s length up in the air, the head of the pin covers approximately the amount of sky that appears in the Hubble Deep Field. The iconic 1995 image is crowded, not because it’s a broad swath of sky but because it’s a broad swath of time. The Hubble Deep Field is more than 12 billion light-years deep. Robert Williams was the director of the Hubble’s science institute back in 1995, and it was his decision to attempt a deep field observation with the telescope. Previous calculations had indicated that Hubble would not be able to detect very distant galaxies, but Williams figured they’d never...
The Outer Planets: Hubble Space Telescopes’s Continuing Legacy [Video]
Astronomy

The Outer Planets: Hubble Space Telescopes’s Continuing Legacy [Video]

The Outer Planets: Hubble Space Telescopes’s Continuing Legacy [Video][embedded content] What is OPAL? OPAL (Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy) is a project to obtain long time baseline observations of the outer planets in order to understand their atmospheric dynamics and evolution as gas giants. The yearly observations from OPAL throughout the remainder of Hubble’s operation will provide an important legacy of time-domain images for use by planetary scientists. Viewers might notice that some of the images of the same planets appear to be different colors. This is due to the fact that over the years, from Voyager to Hubble, many different instruments, and many different filters have been used. Music Credits: “The Granted Wish” by Nicholas Techer [BMI] via Koka Media [SACEM], Universal Pu...
Tour of Asteroid Bennu
Astronomy

Tour of Asteroid Bennu

Tour of Asteroid Bennu When NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft arrived at asteroid Bennu in December 2018, its close-up images confirmed what mission planners had predicted nearly two decades before: Bennu is made of loose material weakly clumped together by gravity, and shaped like a spinning top. This major validation, however, was accompanied by a major surprise. Scientists had expected Bennu’s surface to consist of fine-grained material like a sandy beach, but were instead greeted by a rugged world littered with boulders – the size of cars, the size of houses, the size of football fields. Now, thanks to laser altimetry data and high-resolution imagery from OSIRIS-REx, we can take a tour of Bennu’s remarkable terrain. Unlock the secrets of asteroid Bennu: https://ww...
Webinar about Adaptive Optics
Astronomy

Webinar about Adaptive Optics

Webinar about Adaptive Optics This webinar covered three applications of adaptive optics: vision science, microscopy and astronomy. Three AO key opinions leaders shared their latest results (march 2015): - Dr. Alfredo Dubra, Medical College of Wisconsin - Prof. Francois Rigaut, Australian National University - Dr. Kai Wang, Betzig Lab, HHMI Janelia Research Campus More info: www.alpao.com