Friday, June 18

Astronomy

Have You Ever Seen An Eclipse From Space? Check It Out
Astronomy, Science

Have You Ever Seen An Eclipse From Space? Check It Out

Have You Ever Seen An Eclipse From Space? Check It Out Simulating alien worlds, designing spacecraft with origami and using tiny fossils to understand the lives of ancient organisms are all in a day’s work for interns at NASA. Here’s how interns are taking our missions and science farther. 1. Connecting Satellites in Space Becca Foust looks as if she’s literally in space – or, at least, on a sci-fi movie set. She’s surrounded by black, except for the brilliant white comet model suspended behind her. Beneath the socks she donned just for this purpose, the black floor reflects the scene like perfectly still water across a lake as she describes what happens here: “We have five spacecraft simulators that ‘fly’ in a specially designed flat-floor facility,” she says. “The spacecraft simulator...
A Simulation of Sunsets on Other Worlds: From Venus to Titan
Astronomy, NASA

A Simulation of Sunsets on Other Worlds: From Venus to Titan

A Simulation of Sunsets on Other Worlds: From Venus to Titan When we think of exploring other planets and celestial bodies, we tend to focus on the big questions. How would astronauts live there when they’re not working? What kind of strategies and technology would be needed for people to be there long term? How might the gravity, environment, and radiation effect humans who choose to make places like the Moon, Mars, and other bodies place their home? We tend to overlook the simple stuff… For example, what will it be like to look up at the sky? How will Earth, the stars, and any moon in orbit appear? And how will it look to watch the sun go down? These are things we take for granted here on Earth and don’t really ponder much. But thanks to NASA, we now have a tool that simulates what sun...
Asteroids, Asteroids, Asteroids!
Astronomy

Asteroids, Asteroids, Asteroids!

Asteroids, Asteroids, Asteroids! The Planetary Society • June 25, 2020 The Downlink: Weekly resources to fuel your love of space Space Snapshot NASA June 2020 Solar Eclipse from International Space Station NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, who was aboard the International Space Station at the time, photographed the shadow created by a solar eclipse on 21 June 2020. NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy photographed the shadow created by last weekend’s solar eclipse from his vantage point aboard the International Space Station. The eclipse’s path crossed central Africa, Saudi Arabia, northern India, and southern China. Learn more about solar eclipses here. You love space, now take action This weekly newsletter is your toolkit to learn more about space, share...
On This Day in Space! June 27, 1997: NEAR Shoemaker flies by asteroid Mathilde
Astronomy

On This Day in Space! June 27, 1997: NEAR Shoemaker flies by asteroid Mathilde

On This Day in Space! June 27, 1997: NEAR Shoemaker flies by asteroid Mathilde On June 27, 1997, NASA's NEAR Shoemaker spacecraft flew by an asteroid named 253 Mathilde. NEAR, which stands for Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous, launched in 1996 to go orbit another asteroid named 433 Eros, and it flew by Mathilde along the way. The spacecraft was hibernating in a low-power state for nearly 16 months before the mission's scientists woke it up to look at Mathilde. It whizzed by the asteroid going over 22,000 mph and came within 750 miles of its surface. The flyby lasted about 25 minutes, and the spacecraft took hundreds of photos along the way – enough to image 60 percent of the asteroid's surface. Scientists were stoked about the quality of the images from this super-fast flyby. They found t...
Your Impact: June 2020 Solstice
Astronomy, NASA, Science

Your Impact: June 2020 Solstice

Your Impact: June 2020 Solstice From Our Member Magazine The 2020 Day of Action Antonio Peronace for The Planetary Society A Successful Day of Action More than 100 members of The Planetary Society from 28 states came to Washington, D.C. for the 2020 Day of Action. In early February, 115 Planetary Society members from 28 different states came together in Washington, D.C. for our annual Day of Action. Backed by tens of thousands of members worldwide, these advocates met with their representatives in Congress to speak in support of space science and exploration. Over the course of one busy day, Planetary Society members had 161 meetings with con- gressional offices. They asked their elected leaders to embrace the search for life as a core motivation for exploration, to extend huma...