Monday, November 29

Astronomy

Your Impact: June 2020 Solstice
Astronomy, NASA, Science

Your Impact: June 2020 Solstice

Your Impact: June 2020 Solstice From Our Member Magazine The 2020 Day of Action Antonio Peronace for The Planetary Society A Successful Day of Action More than 100 members of The Planetary Society from 28 states came to Washington, D.C. for the 2020 Day of Action. In early February, 115 Planetary Society members from 28 different states came together in Washington, D.C. for our annual Day of Action. Backed by tens of thousands of members worldwide, these advocates met with their representatives in Congress to speak in support of space science and exploration. Over the course of one busy day, Planetary Society members had 161 meetings with con- gressional offices. They asked their elected leaders to embrace the search for life as a core motivation for exploration, to extend huma...
Special Celestial Events in June 2020
Astronomy, NASA

Special Celestial Events in June 2020

Special Celestial Events in June 2020 From the first-ever image of a black hole, to astronaut Christina Koch breaking the record for the longest single spaceflight by a woman – 2019 was full of awe-inspiring events! As we look forward to a new decade, we’ve taken ten of our top Instagram posts and put them here for your viewing pleasure. With eight out of ten being carousels, be sure to click on each title to navigate to the full post. In a historic feat by the Event horizon Telescope and National Science Foundation, an image of a black hole and its shadow was captured for the first time. At a whopping 3.4 million likes, this image takes home the gold as our most loved photo of 2019. Several of our missions were part of a large effort to observe this black hole using different wavelengt...
A Ring of Fire and Titan’s Explosive Volcanoes
Astronomy

A Ring of Fire and Titan’s Explosive Volcanoes

A Ring of Fire and Titan's Explosive Volcanoes The Planetary Society • June 19, 2020 The Downlink: Weekly resources to fuel your love of space Space Snapshot JAXA / ISAS / NAOJ Hinode views an annular solar eclipse, January 4, 2010 An annular solar eclipse (like this one imaged by JAXA’s Hinode spacecraft in 2010) happens when the Moon is at its furthest distance from Earth and passes in between the Earth and the Sun, leaving the Sun's visible outer edges to form a “ring of fire,” or annulus, around the Moon. This kind of eclipse will happen this Sunday, 21 June. The ring of fire will be visible from central Africa and through Asia. Many other locations from southeastern Europe to the northern tips of Australia will experience a partial annular eclipse. Elsewhere, you can watch a liv...
Comet Encke and a prehistoric village
Astronomy

Comet Encke and a prehistoric village

Comet Encke and a prehistoric village By Bill Napier, AOP Visiting Astronomer A comet typically comprises about 50% fine dust embedded in a frozen matrix of water, methane, carbon dioxide and other organic compounds. Approaching the inner planetary system it begins to disintegrate, with fragments splitting off along with dust and gas. The fragments spread around the orbit, forming a meteor stream. If the Earth’s orbit intersects that of the comet, we see an annual meteor shower. There are about ten annual showers in which a dozen or more shooting stars can be seen every hour, and many more weaker meteor showers, merging into the general sporadic background of meteors which cannot be associated with any particular comet. On occasion, a meteor shower may be so intense that it is best desc...